Arts House and Campbelltown Arts Centre acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of the lands we work on, the Bunurong Boon Wurrung and Wurundjeri Woi Wurrung peoples and the Dharawal people. We extend our respect to Elders past, present and future, while respecting Custodians of the vast Nations our digital platforms reach. We extend this acknowledgement to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists, audiences and communities.
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Assembly for the Future
– Somewhere, Everywhere, Right Here – Global Struggle Comes Home

Assembly 2 art work by Elliat Rich swirling black and white interlocking pattern close up
Listen here from
July 23
2:00 PM

About

No wonder the future was hard to imagine back in 2020. Delivering an address from 2029, our First Speaker Scott Ludlam takes us through the radical and surprising transformations of the preceding decade. If we could send a message back to our 2020 selves, what would we say?

Ludlam tells us to hold on to each other; it gets weirder and harder. But know that the seedlings of the good fortune were being cultivated all around us even if it felt we were working in the dark. When the impossible contradictions of the old world began to splinter and smash, what grew into the open ground was genuinely new; an international, post-capitalist uprising, leaderless and somehow everywhere, bigger and richer than our brittle nationalisms could contain. We knew it was real because it wore its lineage so proudly, grounded in the oldest living cultures on earth, thousands of years in the making, carried forward now by a generation of children determined to seize their own century. Mostly, Ludlam wants us to know that with boldness and care, insight and compassion, we find a way home.

Assembly for the Future is a series of participatory, digital gatherings of around 70 citizens who will create new visions for futures that may be credible, idealistic or utterly fanciful. Our aim is to develop the practice of imagination.

A multi-platform exploration of futures to come in the era of climates changed and changing, we transport collaborators, participants and audiences to 2029 when significant impacts on planetary health are a daily reality causing powerful transformations of our cultural, political and energy systems.

Using a simple approach involving a keynote provocation, creative responses and facilitated collective creation, we will envisage new pathways for the coming ten years.

Working within an assembly of thinkers, artists and provocateurs, we invite you to become protagonists, to put your imagination at the service of creating other, better, futures.

Presented by

  • Presented by Arts House, City of Melbourne as part of BLEED 2020.

Artistic Credits

  • Keeper of Time and coCurator for the Future: Alex Kelly
  • Dramaturg and coCurator for the Future: David Pledger
  • Producer for the Future: Sophia Marinos
  • First Speaker: Scott Ludlam
  • Respondents: Roj Amedi, Santilla Chingaipe
  • Moderators: Genevieve Grieves, Jen Rae, Jennifer Mills, Lawrence Harvey, Zena Cumpston, Huong Truong, Sophie Hyde, Tim Baker, Pippa Bailey, Zena Cumpston
  • Artists: Aaron Cupples + Declan Furber Gillick
  • Usher: Robbie McEwan
  • Future Archive Commission: Gillian Lever, Lisa Bartolomei, Sophie Gleeson
  • Future Archive: Lawrence Harvey & SIAL Studios RMIT
  • Composer: Aaron Cupples
  • Visual Design: Elliat Rich

Supported by

  • Assembly for the Future is a project of The Things We Did Next collaboration. The Things We Did Next is co-created by Alex Kelly & David Pledger and produced by Not Yet It’s Difficult and Something Somewhere Inc.
  • This work is supported by Arts House, City of Melbourne as part of BLEED 2020, The Lord Mayor’s Charitable Foundation, Bertha Foundation, Monash Climate Change Communications Research Hub and RMIT SIAL Studios.
  • This work was developed with the generous support of Arts House CultureLAB, Arts NT, Australia Council for the Arts, Besen Foundation and Vitalstatistix Adhocracy program.
  • BLEED is conceived, produced and presented by City of Melbourne through Arts House and Campbelltown City Council through Campbelltown Arts Centre. BLEED has been assisted by the Federal Government through Australia Council for the Arts, its funding and advisory body.

Schedule

02:00 PM AEST
Thursday 23 July
Duration: 120 mins
Add to Calendar 07/23/2020 02:00 pm 07/23/2020 04:00 pm Australia/Melbourne Assembly for the Future – Somewhere, Everywhere, Right Here – Global Struggle Comes Home https://bleedonline.net/program/assembly-for-the-future/somewhere-everywhere-right-here-global-struggle-comes-home/ BLEED : Biennial Live Event in the Everyday Digital Arts House and Campbelltown Arts Centre

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Registrations will close at
10am on Thursday 23 July.
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Bios

Scott Ludlam

Scott Ludlam is a writer, activist and former Australian Greens Senator. He served in Parliament from 2008 – 2017, and as Co-Deputy Leader of his party from 2015 – 2017. Currently working as a freelance researcher and troublemaker, while writing occasional pieces for Meanjin, the Monthly, Junkee and the Guardian. His first book on ecology, technology and politics will be published any year now, pandemic permitting.

Santilla Chingaipe

Santilla Chingaipe is a journalist and filmmaker whose work explores migration, cultural identities and politics. Chingaipe is a regular contributor to The Saturday Paper, and serves as a member of the Federal Government’s Advisory Group on Australia-Africa Relations (AGAAR). The recipient of a number of awards, she was recently recognised at the United Nations as one of the most influential people of African descent in the world. Her first book of non-fiction exploring African migration to Australia pre-federation, is due later this year through Pan MacMillan.

Roj Amedi

Roj Amedi is a writer, strategist and human rights advocate passionate about design, contemporary art, and access to justice. Since migrating to Australia as an Iraqi-Kurdish refugee, Roj has campaigned for refugee, migrant, and LGBTIQ+ rights, and worked with organisations such as GetUp!, Colour Code and Justice Connect. Previously, she has been an editor at Acclaim Magazine and Neue Luxury, and is currently on the board of the Human Rights Arts and Film Festival and Overland Journal. Her life’s work is economic and racial justice.

Genevieve Grieves

Genevieve Grieves is a Worimi woman, traditionally from mid north coast New South Wales, who has lived in Narrm (Melbourne) for many years. She is an award-winning Indigenous artist, researcher, educator, curator, film-maker and oral historian who has accumulated twenty years experience across the arts, culture and education sectors. Genevieve has consistently won recognition and awards for the variety of projects she has undertaken throughout her diverse career including online documentaries, film, art and exhibitions.

Dr Jen Rae

Dr Jen Rae is an artist, researcher, facilitator and educator, based in Narrm (Melbourne) and the Director of Fair Share Fare. Her 15-year practice-led research expertise is in the discursive field of contemporary environmental art and environmental communication. It is centred around cultural responses to climate change/everything change – specifically the role of artists and creative inquiry.

Jennifer Mills

Jennifer Mills is the author of the novels The Airways (forthcoming: Picador, 2021), Dyschronia (Picador, 2018), Gone (UQP, 2011) and The Diamond Anchor (UQP, 2009) and a collection of short stories, The Rest is Weight (UQP, 2012). In 2019 Dyschronia was shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Literary Award, Australia’s most prestigious prize for literary fiction, the Adelaide Festival Awards for Literature, and the Aurealis Awards for science fiction.

Lawrence Harvey

Lawrence Harvey is a composer, sound designer and director of SIAL Sound Studios, School of Design, RMIT University. He has led various ARC and industry funded projects, supervises research candidates and teaches into the Spatial Sound stream of the Master of Design Innovation Technology (MDIT) degree. He is Artistic Advisor to the RMIT Sonic Arts Collection and directs public concerts and exhibitions for the collection on the SIAL Sound Studios speaker orchestra. Harvey has also collaborated in interdisciplinary teaching and research with musicians and artists, interior, digital and industrial designers, and architects. In addition to electroacoustic compositions, he has produced gallery and urban sound installations, spatial sound designs for VR and theatre, and performed around Australia and in Seoul, Huddersfield, The Hague and Vienna.

Zena Cumpston

Zena Cumpston is a Barkandji woman currently working as a Research Fellow for the Clean Air Urban Landscapes Hub at the University of Melbourne, undertaking research and projects which explore Aboriginal perspectives of biodiversity in urban areas. Zena was the lead researcher, co-producer and co-designer of ‘The Living Pavilion’, a temporary living laboratory comprised of 40,000 Kulin Nation plants which celebrated and explored Indigenous knowledge, custodianship and belonging. She also works as a freelance writer, researcher and consultant. Most recently Zena’s freelance work has been with Science Gallery Melbourne as a researcher and mentor, working with young Aboriginal people to produce Indigenous Design workshops to be presented in high schools, aimed at encouraging students to consider Indigenous perspectives in tackling modern environmental challenges. In 2019 she collaborated with artist and curator Jonathon Jones, Uncle Bruce Pascoe and Professor Bill Gammage on ‘Bunha-bunhanga; Aboriginal Agriculture in the south-east’ as part of the Tarnanthi Aboriginal Festival at the Art Gallery of South Australia. She has recently been published in People and Nature, The Conversation, The Adelaide Review and the Australian Garden History Journal. Zena is currently curating an exhibition in partnership with the CAUL Hub, Science Gallery, The Old Quad and the Melbourne University Herbarium which revolves around Aboriginal plant use engaging with Aboriginal artists, research and community perspectives to interrogate the lens through which Aboriginal agricultural and plant knowledge has been perceived since Invasion.

Huong Truong

Huong Truong is a community activist based in Melbourne’s Western suburbs. She is currently Co-Convenor of the Greater Sunshine Community Alliance. She is also a former Greens Victorian Parliamentarian, local government officer and union organiser.

Sophie Hyde

Sophie Hyde is a founding member of film collective Closer Productions. She lives and works on the lands of the Kaurna people in South Australia and makes provocative and intimate films and television. Her debut feature drama 52 Tuesdays (director/producer/co-writer) won the directing award at Sundance and the Crystal Bear at the Berlin Film Festival. She directed and produced the Australian/Irish co-production Animals starring Holliday Grainger and Alia Shawkat, which premiered in Sundance 2019 and won a BIFA for Best Debut Screenplay. She created, produced and directed episodic series F*!#ing Adelaide, which premiered in competition at Series Mania and screened on ABC Australia. She created, produced and directed (EP4) the 4 x 1-hour series The Hunting, which won two Australian Academy Awards for Best Screenplay in Television and Best Supporting Actor for Richard Roxburgh. Commissioned by SBS, it has become their most watched commissioned program ever. Sophie’s feature documentaries include Life in Movement (producer /co-director), winner of the Australian  ocumentary Prize, Shut Up Little Man! An Audio Misadventure (producer) and Sam Klemke’s Time Machine (producer), which both premiered at Sundance Film Festival and In My Blood It Runs (Producer) which premiered at Hotdocs, had a very successful cinema run, and will soon screen on PBS (USA), ARTE (France and Germany and ABC (Australia).

Tim Baker

Tim Baker is an author, journalist and storyteller specializing in surfing history and culture, working across a variety of media from books and magazines to film, video, and theatre. Tim is the best-selling author of Occy, High Surf, Bustin’ Down The Door,  Surf For Your Life, Century of Surf and Surfari.  He is a former editor of Tracks and Surfing Life magazines, and a three-time winner of the Surfing Australia Hall of Fame Culture Award.

Pippa Bailey

Pippa Bailey grew up on Wangal Land in Sydney, starting her career as a performer and reporter/ producer with SBSTV. Pippa spent many years in the UK. She was Artistic Director for The Museum Of on London’s South Bank and also for oh!art @ Oxford House; an Associate Director with The World Famous – innovate company of pyrotechnicians and also produced the Total Theatre Awards at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2007-12. She developed BiDiNG TiME, an international participatory theatre project, to highlight the vital need to empower a diverse range of women and imagine new systems that respond to environmental and economic crisis. Pippa has worked as a producer with extraordinary independent Australian artists including Ghenoa Gela, Nakkiah Lui, Amrita Hepi, Martin del Amo, Branch Nebula, The Climate Guardians and Sandra Thibodeaux while working at Performing Lines and she was senior producer for Sydney Festival 2019. She is on the Advisory Board of IETM – International Performing Arts Network and a board member of Theatre Network NSW. Pippa was Director of ChangeFest 19 and is passionate about culture leading on climate action to create a fair and sustainable future.

Zena Cumpston

Zena Cumpston is a Barkandji woman currently working as a Research Fellow for the Clean Air Urban Landscapes Hub at the University of Melbourne, undertaking research and projects which explore Aboriginal perspectives of biodiversity in urban areas. Zena was the lead researcher, co-producer and co-designer of ‘The Living Pavilion’, a temporary living laboratory comprised of 40,000 Kulin Nation plants which celebrated and explored Indigenous knowledge, custodianship and belonging. She also works as a freelance writer, researcher and consultant. Most recently Zena’s freelance work has been with Science Gallery Melbourne as a researcher and mentor, working with young Aboriginal people to produce Indigenous Design workshops to be presented in high schools, aimed at encouraging students to consider Indigenous perspectives in tackling modern environmental challenges. In 2019 she collaborated with artist and curator Jonathon Jones, Uncle Bruce Pascoe and Professor Bill Gammage on ‘Bunha-bunhanga; Aboriginal Agriculture in the south-east’ as part of the Tarnanthi Aboriginal Festival at the Art Gallery of South Australia. She has recently been published in People and Nature, The Conversation, The Adelaide Review and the Australian Garden History Journal. Zena is currently curating an exhibition in partnership with the CAUL Hub, Science Gallery, The Old Quad and the Melbourne University Herbarium which revolves around Aboriginal plant use engaging with Aboriginal artists, research and community perspectives to interrogate the lens through which Aboriginal agricultural and plant knowledge has been perceived since Invasion.

Aaron Cupples

Aaron Cupples is an Australian composer, record producer and mix engineer currently based in London, UK. His first feature-length composition for the film Island of the Hungry Ghosts was nominated for several awards including ‘Best Music’ at the British Independent Film Awards 2018. His latest feature-length score for The Disappearance Of My Mother recently premiered at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival. As a record producer Aaron Cupples has worked with artists such as Spiritualized, The Vaccines, Blanck Mass, Alex Cameron, and his own project Civil Civic.

Zena Cumpston is a Barkandji woman currently working as a Research Fellow for the Clean Air Urban Landscapes Hub at the University of Melbourne, undertaking research and projects which explore Aboriginal perspectives of biodiversity in urban areas. Zena was the lead researcher, co-producer and co-designer of ‘The Living Pavilion’, a temporary living laboratory comprised of 40,000 Kulin Nation plants which celebrated and explored Indigenous knowledge, custodianship and belonging. She also works as a freelance writer, researcher and consultant. Most recently Zena’s freelance work has been with Science Gallery Melbourne as a researcher and mentor, working with young Aboriginal people to produce Indigenous Design workshops to be presented in high schools, aimed at encouraging students to consider Indigenous perspectives in tackling modern environmental challenges. In 2019 she collaborated with artist and curator Jonathon Jones, Uncle Bruce Pascoe and Professor Bill Gammage on ‘Bunha-bunhanga; Aboriginal Agriculture in the south-east’ as part of the Tarnanthi Aboriginal Festival at the Art Gallery of South Australia. She has recently been published in People and Nature, The Conversation, The Adelaide Review and the Australian Garden History Journal. Zena is currently curating an exhibition in partnership with the CAUL Hub, Science Gallery, The Old Quad and the Melbourne University Herbarium which revolves around Aboriginal plant use engaging with Aboriginal artists, research and community perspectives to interrogate the lens through which Aboriginal agricultural and plant knowledge has been perceived since Invasion.

Declan Furber Gillick

Declan Furber Gillick is an independent, multi-award winning Arrernte artist, musician and educator with a passion for mentoring young artists and writers. His creative practice spans playwrighting, poetry, film, prose and visual arts as well as hip-hop, and rap (performing and releasing music under the name Knomad). Declan completed a Masters in Writing for Performance at Victorian College of The Arts in 2017 and has been a writer-in-residence as part of Melbourne Theatre Company’s Next Stage program since 2018. Declan is also an activist, a radio broadcaster with 3RRR Melbourne and a facilitator and teacher, having taught at primary, secondary and tertiary levels. He has had work published with Southerly, Centre For Indigenous Story, University of Queensland Press and Affirm Press. His plays include BIGHOUSE DREAMING, Scar Trees and Jacky, the last of which was commissioned by Melbourne Theatre Company in 2019. He has released his debut EP as Knomad in 2019, entitled Love and Politics Pt. One, and you can find his work on Spotify as well as on Instagram @kno_mad_music.

Sophia Marinos

Sophia Marinos has worked in diverse areas of social justice and the arts, both internationally and locally. Sophia was the creative producer of Big hART’s multi-platform Namatjira project from 2009-2018, leading a successful and historic campaign to restore the copyright in Albert Namatjira’s works to his family. With Big hART she was National Producer, producing numerous theatrical works, community engagement programs and social impact campaigns, on issues as diverse as slavery at sea, Indigenous languages policy, cultural diversity and Indigenous incarceration. She has produced Man With The Iron Neck for Legs On The Wall; worked with Indigenous strategic design and technology company Old Ways, New on how Indigenous Knowledges can inform new and emerging technologies; produced monthly singing events for The Welcome Choir; and has worked with Bob Brown Foundation.

Robbie McEwan

Robbie McEwan is a cross-platform producer, filmmaker and assistant director from Aotearoa New Zealand who has produced with Screen Australia and screened films at MIFF, SFF, MQFF and international festivals. Robbie’s audio productions have been broadcast on RNZ National, ABC RN’s 360documentaries and Earshot. For the audio feature ‘Chasing Meteors’ he received a 2017 Kavli Science Journalism Award for Excellence in Audio Reporting from the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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